Are there many “illegal migrants” in Russia?

Human rights organization Civic Assistance and “Such Cases” launch the joint project “Myths about Migrations” where experts refute stereotypes of foreigners living in Russia.

Sergei Abashin, Professor of Anthropology at the European University of St Petersburg, explains how many “illegal” migrants are in Russia.

The problem with counting the number of “illegal” migrants, or “not fully documented” or “unregulated” as it is more correct to call them, is that we do not have a clear criteria for illegality.

The only figure that can be more or less adequately calculated is the number of foreign citizens in Russia whose work activity is “unregulated”. In 2017, about 4.5 million immigrants from the Commonwealth Independent States (CIS) entered Russia and were put on the migration register with the purpose of working.

Will schools become overcrowded and quality of education decline if children of migrants claim places at schools?

“Such Cases” and Civic Assistance Committee on International Migrant Day complete the cycle of myths about foreigners living in Russia. HSE anthropologist Yekaterina Demintseva, an associate professor at the Higher School of Economics, explains why there are more migrant children in schools and why this trend is positive for Russian society.

“Such Cases” and Civic Assistance Committee on International Migrant Day complete the cycle of myths about foreigners living in Russia. HSE anthropologist Yekaterina Demintseva, an associate professor at the Higher School of Economics, explains why there are more migrant children in schools and why this trend is positive for Russian society.

The number of migrant children in schools is increasing, simply because more families settle in Russia and it is important for them that the child joins society, and will not feel like a stranger.

Do migrants enjoy and receive the benefits and social welfare provisions for Russians?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. HSE anthropologist Ekaterina Demintseva refutes the misconception that foreigners enjoy numerous Russian benefits and explains why it would be better for all of us if this were true.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. HSE anthropologist Ekaterina Demintseva refutes the misconception that foreigners enjoy numerous Russian benefits and explains why it would be better for all of us if this were true.

Many people imagine that a migrant comes to the country and then receives benefits for years.

Are remittances made by migrants back to their homeland a huge financial drain on Russia?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Sergey Abashin, a professor at the anthropology department of the European University at St. Petersburg, considers how much money the migrants send to their homeland and whether these figures really are large.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Sergey Abashin, a professor at the anthropology department of the European University at St.

Do migrants reduce wages?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Doctor of Economic Sciences Irina Ivakhnyuk examines a common misconception that the overall level of wages in the sector fall due to foreign workers.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Doctor of Economic Sciences Irina Ivakhnyuk examines a common misconception that the overall level of wages in the sector fall due to foreign workers.

Nominally the monthly wage of foreign workers is almost equal to the salary of Russian citizens employed in similar jobs.

Do migrants take our jobs?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Doctor of Economics Irina Ivakhnyuk tells us why foreign workers do not take jobs away from Russians, but, on the contrary, save the labor market.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Doctor of Economics Irina Ivakhnyuk tells us why foreign workers do not take jobs away from Russians, but, on the contrary, save the labor market.

Behind this common stereotype is an artificially simplified understanding of the situation on the labor market and that, if migrants were “removed”, there will be great employment opportunities for Russians.

Do migrants bring HIV and Tuberculosis to Russia?

“Such Cases” and Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Anthropologist Daniel Kashnitsky talks about the prejudice that newcomers bring contagious diseases to Russia, and how Russian legislation reinforces the fear of those migrants who are really sick.

“Such Cases” and Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Anthropologist Daniel Kashnitsky talks about the prejudice that newcomers bring contagious diseases to Russia, and how Russian legislation reinforces the fear of those migrants who are really sick.

According to Law No. 38 “On the Prevention of the Spread in the Russian Federation of the Disease Caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus”, there is a practice to deport foreigners with HIV infection.

Is an Islamization of Russia happening due to migration from Central Asia?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Anthropologist Dmitry Oparin refutes the stereotypes of visitors from Central Asia and explains why halal cafes and crowds on the streets during Muslim holidays does not mean the Islamization of Russia.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. Anthropologist Dmitry Oparin refutes the stereotypes of visitors from Central Asia and explains why halal cafes and crowds on the streets during Muslim holidays does not mean the Islamization of Russia.

 

I think, rather, there is some kind of trend for religious intensification.

Are most crimes in Russia committed by migrants?

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. One of society’s most common fears is that many migrants are criminals. Anthropologist Andrei Yakimov explains whether the majority of crimes in Russia are committed by foreigners.

“Such Cases” and the Civic Assistance Committee continue to dismantle the myths about migrants. One of society’s most common fears is that many migrants are criminals.

Syrian Refugees in Russia Trapped in Legal Limbo

The Kremlin is trying desperately to end the war in Syria, but it wants nothing to do with displaced Syrians at home.

NOGINSK — In a gray industrial city an hour outside of Moscow, Safa sits in front of a room full of low desks and child-size chairs. On the walls around her, posters of the Arabic alphabet hang next to pictures of cartoon animals with their names written in Russian.

‘AIDS Boy,’ ‘Dog,’ And ‘Disgrace To Society’: How Russia Greets Gay Men Seeking Asylum

In mid-July, a gay, HIV-positive foreigner arrived at an immigration office in Moscow seeking asylum in Russia. Unlike in his native Uzbekistan, where sex between men is punishable by up to three years in prison, Russia has not criminalized homosexual relations.

But as he and his lawyer discussed his case with an immigration officer, their interlocutor made clear she had no sympathy for people like him.

“If it were up to me, they would all be put up against a wall,” the officer with the Moscow branch of the Russian Interior Ministry’s Main Directorate of Migration Affairs said, according to audio of the conversation obtained by RFE/RL. At one point in the conversation, the officer, who said she herself hailed from the applicant’s Central Asian homeland, switched to the man’s native language to express her disapproval of the man’s sexual orientation.

“Cursed be your father.